Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship:

He Knows My Affliction: The Hill Onidah as Narrative Counterpart to the Rameumptom

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Published by:
Interpreter A Journal of Mormon Scripture
Published:
12/27/2019
Specs:
Digest / 5.25" x 8.25"
32 pages Saddle-stitched
Category:
Religion
Tags:
Alma 32, Book of Mormon, church of jesus christ of latter-day saints, etymology, lds, Mormonism, Onidah, Rameumptom

Abstract: The toponym Onidah, attested as the name of a hill in Alma 32:4, most plausibly derives from Hebrew ʿŏnî /ʿōnî/ʿônî (ʿonyî, “my affliction”) + yādaʿ/yēdaʿ (“he knew,” “he knows”) — i.e., “he has acknowledged my affliction” or “he knows my affliction.” In view of the pejorative lexical associations of the Rameumptom, the “high” and “holy stand,” with Hebrew rām (< rwm, “high”) and haughtiness, arrogance, and pride, we see Mormon using the Rameumptom, the “high” platform for Zoramite self-exalting worship, with Onidah, the hill from which Alma and Amulek taught the Zoramite poor and humble. The latter name and Alma’s teaching from that location constituted a sign that the Lord “knew” their “affliction.” Alma devotes a significant part of his message extolling the spiritual value of their state of “affliction” and humiliation or compelled “humility” and teaching them how to “plant” the “word” (even Jesus Christ himself) in their hearts through prayer.

Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship: He Kno...


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